MENDING FENCES

24 02 2019

Mending Fences Cover

Mending Fences is a very good book. You have two people living at Windmill Farm as a rehab to get back into society. Luke, who was raised as an Amish, and Izzy, from the English side. Izzy has already be at the farm and learning much from Amos and Fern Lapp when Luke moves in – into the barn. She wants to be Amish, but does she want to embrace God, too? The mending fences title comes from following Luke, who in the past, had hurt many people with practical jokes. Through this, he begins to heal and come to God whole-heartedly. But are these two beginning to like each other? You will have to read the book to find that out for yourselves!

Luke Schrock is a new and improved man after a stint in rehab, though everyone in Stoney Ridge only remembers the old Luke. They might have forgiven him, but nobody trusts him.

Amos and Fern Lapp allow Luke to live at Windmill Farm under two conditions. First, Luke must make a sincere apology to each person he’s hurt–a four-page, single-spaced list. Second, he must ask each victim of mischief to describe the damage he caused.

Simple, Luke thinks. Offering apologies is easy. But discovering the lasting effects his careless actions have caused . . . that isn’t so simple. It’s gut-wrenching.

And his list keeps growing. Izzy Miller, beautiful and frustratingly aloof, also boards at Windmill Farm. Luke’s clumsy efforts to befriend Izzy only insult and annoy her. Eager to impress, Luke sets out to prove himself to her by locating her mother. When he does, her identity sends shock waves through Stoney Ridge.

suzanne-woods-fisher-author

Suzanne Woods Fisher is a bestselling author of Amish fiction and non-fiction. Her interest in the Amish began with her grandfather, who was raised Plain in Franklin County, Pennsylvania. She travels back east a couple of times each year for research. For fun, too.

Suzanne has a great admiration for the Plain people and believes they provide wonderful examples to the world. She has an underlying belief in her books–you don’t have to “go Amish” to incorporate many of their principles into your life: simplicity, living with less, appreciating nature, forgiving others more readily, trusting in God.

When Suzanne isn’t writing, playing tennis, or bragging to her friends about her grandbabies (so cute!), she is raising puppies for Guide Dogs for the Blind. To her way of thinking, you just can’t take life too seriously when a puppy is tearing through your house with someone’s underwear in its mouth.

Mending Fences became available for purchase on February 5, 2019.

I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher for this review.

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